Connecting The Power And The Shower Fitting

1. After fixing the shower unit to the bathroom wall and making the connection from the rising main, thread in the circuit cable.

2. Feed the cable up the unit and strip it before connecting the red and black cores to the L and N terminals respectively. 3. Remember to sleeve the bare earth core in green/yellow PVC before feeding it into the earth terminal and connecting it Lip. 4. Then make sure that the clamp plate will bear down on the cable sheathing before tightening it up to protect all the connections. Connecting Shower Fitting

Before you get to grips with installing a new shower cubicle, you ought to select the type of control fitting you’re going to use. Your choice may affect the way you organize the plumbing. Once you’ve decided where you’re going to site your shower — over a bath or in a separate cubicle — you’ll have to determine what type of fitting you’re going to use to run it. In order for the shower to work effectively, you need to be able to control the rate of flow of water and also, more importantly, it’s temperature. There’s nothing worse than standing under a stuttering supply of water that’s hot one minute and cold the next. So it’s the job of the shower fitting to provide this control fast and effectively. Sane fittings work by having individual taps to control the hot and cold water supplies, while the more sophisticated types have a simple valve or a mixer. How they are connected up to the water supply depends primarily on their design. For example, instantaneous showers need only to be connected to the mains cold water supply, as they heat all the hot water required just before it comes out of the shower rose. A hot water supply is therefore unnecessary. But for all other showers, the temperature of the water is controlled by mixing together separate supplies of hot and cold water which may also be at different pressures. The simplest fittings Before proper showers over a bath and separate shower cubicles became popular, it was quite common to find a rather makeshift device being used to supply a spray of water. This consisted of length of rubber hose with a rose attached at one end and two connectors fitted at the other which slipped over the hot and cold taps on the bath.